TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Anne Bronte - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Anne Bronte

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of Anne Bronte, author of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall; nineteenth century British Literature / English Literature
Portrait of Anne Bronte by Patrick Branwell Bronte (1835).
Anne Bronte   (1820 - 1849)
 
Category:  English Literature
 
Born:  January 17, 1820
Thornton, Yorkshire, England
 
Died:  May 28, 1849
Scarborough, England
 
Related authors:
Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte
 
list all writers
 
 
Anne Bronte - LIFE STORIES
 
 
5/28/1849     The Death of Anne Bronte
On this day in 1849 Anne Bronte died of tuberculosis, the third death in eight months among the Bronte siblings. The standard view of Anne is that she had less talent than her sisters, and was cut from a plainer cloth: Charlotte was dominant and ambitious, Emily was odd and reclusive, Anne was meek and churchy. More recent biographers have challenged this group portrait.
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Agnes Grey
fiction
 
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
fiction
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY ANNE BRONTE AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
A Life of Anne Bronte
by Edward Chitham
biography
 
The Brontes
by Juliet Barker
biography
 
The Brontes: A Life in Letters
by Juliet Barker (Editor)
letters
 
FIND BOOKS BY ANNE BRONTE AT Powell's Books
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Online Books Page
Find electronic texts including Agnes Grey, Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell, and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. A biography offering commentary and analysis is also provided:

"The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was an immediate success. It is easy today to underestimate the extent to which it was a challenge to existing social and legal structures. May Sinclair, in 1913, said that the slamming of Helen Huntingdon's bedroom door against her husband reverberated throughout Victorian England. Anne's heroine eventually leaves her husband to protect their young son from his influence. She supports herself and her son by painting, while living in hiding, fearful of discovery. In doing so, she violates not only social conventions, but English law. At the time, a married woman had no independent legal existence, apart from her husband. She could not own her own property, sue for divorce, or control custody of her children. If she attempted to live apart from him, her husband had the right to reclaim her. If she took their child with her, she was liable for kidnapping. In living off her own earnings, she was held to be stealing her husband's property, since any income she made was legally his."
The Bronte Sisters
A selection of links to Bronte resources on the Internet, including electronic texts and a variety of literary analysis of theme, symbolism and imagery, spiritualism, religion, and literary concordances (e.g., a comparison between Jane Eyre and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland).
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May 22, 2017
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