TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Edward George Bulwer-Lytton - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, nineteenth century English novelist
Edward George Bulwer-Lytton
(1803 - 1873)

 
Category:  English Literature
 
Born:  May 25, 1803
London, England
 
Died:  January 18, 1873
Torquay, Devon, England
 
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Edward George Bulwer-Lytton - LIFE STORIES
 
 
No articles are presently listed for Edward George Bulwer-Lytton.
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Devereux
fiction
 
Eugene Aram
biography
 
Pelham: Or, the Adventures of a Gentleman
fiction
 
Rienzi, the Last of the Roman Tribunes
fiction
 
The Disowned
fiction
 
The Last Days of Pompeii
fiction
 
The Works of Edward Bulwer-Lytton (19 Volumes)
anthology, fiction
 
Zanoni
fiction
 
Zicci
fiction
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY EDWARD GEORGE BULWER-LYTTON AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Bride of Dark and Stormy: Yet More of the Best (?) From the Bulwer-Lytton Contest
by Scott Rice (Compiler), Bulwer-Lytton Contest
anthology, non-fiction
 
Bulwer Lytton: The Rise and Fall of a Victorian Man of Letters
by Leslie Mitchell
biography
 
Bulwer Lyttons Novels and Isis Unveiled
by S. B. Liljegren
literary criticism and analysis
 
Dark and Stormy Rides Again: The Best (?) from the Bulwer-Lytton Contest
by Scott Rice (Compiler), Bulwer-Lytton Contest
anthology, non-fiction
 
It Was a Dark and Stormy Night: The Best (?) from the Bulwer-Lytton Contest
by Scott Rice (Compiler), Bulwer-Lytton Contest
anthology, non-fiction
 
Liberty and Morality: A Political Biography of Edward Bulwer-Lytton
by Charles W. Snyder
biography
 
Son of "It Was a Dark and Stormy Night": More of the Best (?) From the Bulwer-Lytton Contest
by Scott Rice (Compiler), Bulwer-Lytton Contest
anthology, non-fiction
 
FIND BOOKS BY EDWARD GEORGE BULWER-LYTTON AT Powell's Books
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Guardian Unlimited
Find a September 2003 review of Leslie Mitchell's biography Bulwer Lytton: The Rise and Fall of a Victorian Man of Letters.

"He spent most of his working life looking for slights, feeling offended and demanding apologies from people who didn't realise they had done anything wrong. This fastidiousness about his dignity was doubly odd, given that Lytton went out of his way to make a spectacle of himself: he smoked a pipe that was 7ft long and paraded around town in inappropriately youthful clothes. ... Despite some of his odder ideas (he spent quite a lot of time experimenting with snails to see if they had telepathic abilities), Lytton had one foot planted firmly in the material world. He suggested that authors rather than their publishers retain the copyright on any particular piece of work, and ensured that cranky but important writers such as Godwin and Swinburne were guaranteed a certain level of support from public money."
Bulwer-Lytton
Read a biographical essay offers insights into the writer's influences and intellectual views. With commentary on works including Pelham (1828), The Last Days of Pompeii (1834), Zanoni (1842), Last of the Barons (1843), Harold, or the Last of the Saxon Kings (1848), and The Haunted and the Haunters (1857).

"Lytton's work expresses some of the most significant intellectual currents of the nineteenth century, several of which are far from are exhausted. He treated intelligently and interestingly perennial themes of good and evil, of freedom and despotism, egoism and altruism, life affirmation and the power of will. His treatment can seem all the fresher partly because he is no longer familiar. His influence was world-wide. It was notable in Germany, whose deep and thoughtful culture he both affected and was affected by. He was influenced by Schiller (whom he translated), and by Goethe, sharing something of the latter's eclectic liveliness, and exploring subjects that strongly suggest his speculations about the daemonic. His novel of thirteenth century Italy, Rienzi, inspired Wagner's third opera...."
The Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Context
Read up on the annual contest "where WWW means Wretched Writers Welcome." The website also accepts electronic submissions and nominations.

"An international literary parody contest, the competition honors the memory if not the reputation of Victorian novelist Edward George Earl Bulwer-Lytton (1803-1873), who has just enjoyed his bicentennial. The goal of the contest is childishly simple: entrants are challenged to submit bad opening sentences to imaginary novels. Although best known for The Last Days of Pompeii (1834) and the phrase, 'the pen is mightier than the sword,' Bulwer-Lytton opened his novel Paul Clifford (1830) with the immortal words that the 'Peanuts' beagle Snoopy plagiarized for years, 'It was a dark and stormy night.'"
Victorian Web
This useful resource features a biography, chronological timeline of events in the author's life, bibliography, contextual information about life in Victorian times, and selected essays, including an articled titled "Edward Bulwer and Charles Dickens" that explores the lifelong friendship between the two nineteenth century English novelists.

"If ever a writer embodied what Bulwer believed was the dominant Spirit of the Age, that writer was Charles Dickens. Although not so versatile as Bulwer, a Walter Scott reincarnated, Dickens, who once styled himself 'The Fielding of the 19th c.,' was able to reach through cheap serialisation of his novels a massive audience far beyond that which avidly read Bulwer's metaphysical thrillers. ... The two writers, despite their differences in temperament and even politics as life went on, remained on intimate terms. In March, 1852, Dickens named his tenth and last child after Bulwer, who stood godfather to the boy, the seventh son, whom Dickens nicknamed 'Plorn.'"
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May 22, 2017
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