TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Janet Flanner - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Janet Flanner

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of Janet Flanner
Janet Flanner   (1892 - 1978)
 
Category:  American Literature
 
Born:  March 3, 1892
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
 
Died:  November 7, 1978
New York City, United States
 
Related authors:
Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach
 
list all writers
 
 
Janet Flanner - LIFE STORIES
 
 
11/7/1978     Janet Flanner, France
On this day in 1978 Janet Flanner died. Her bi-weekly "Letter From Paris" was published in The New Yorker for a half-century, and then collected in the award-winning Paris Journal and other volumes. They offer a better and more reliable alternative to such memoirs as Hemingway's A Moveable Feast, from one close to several Lost Generations, and closer to France.
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend
by Janet Flanner, Natalia Danesi Murray (Editor)
letters
 
Janet Flanner's World: Uncollected Writings 1932 - 1975
by Janet Flanner, Irving Drutman (Editor)
anthology, essays
 
London Was Yesterday, 1934-1939
literary history, essays
 
Paris Journal: 1944-1955
by Janet Flanner, William Shawn (Editor)
journal
 
Paris Journal: 1956-1964
by Janet Flanner, William Shawn (Editor)
journal
 
Paris Journal: 1965-1970
by Janet Flanner, William Shawn (Editor)
journal
 
Paris Was Yesterday, 1925-1939
by Janet Flanner, Irving Drutman (Editor)
literary history, essays
 
The Cubical City
fiction
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY JANET FLANNER AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Genet: A Biography of Janet Flanner
by Brenda Wineapple
biography
 
Janet, My Mother, and Me: A Memoir of Growing Up With Janet Flanner and Natalia Danesi Murray
by William Murray
memoirs
 
The Twilight Years: Paris in the 1930s
by William Wiser
non-fiction
 
FIND BOOKS BY JANET FLANNER AT Powell's Books
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Library of Congress
An online exhibit titled Women Come to the Front: Journalists, Photographers, and Broadcasters During World War II presents information about Therese Bonney, Toni Frissell, Marvin Breckinridge Patterson, Clare Boothe Luce, Janet Flanner, Esther Bubley, Dorothea Lange, and May Craig. With a short history of American women journalists, and photographs.

"For female journalists, World War II offered new professional opportunities. Talented and determined, dozens of women fought for--and won--the right to cover the biggest story of their lives. By war's end, at least 127 American women had secured official military accreditation as war correspondents, if not actual front-line assignments. Other women journalists remained on the home front to document the ways in which the country changed dramatically under wartime conditions."
Our Land, Our Literature
Find a short biography and description of Flanner's only novel, The Cubical City.

"In 1922, Flanner moved to Paris, France, and began to focus more on her writing. Though she was primarily a newspaper journalist, she did write one novel, The Cubical City. This work spoke about landmarks and nature that are reflections of her early life in Indiana."
Paris Was a Woman (AUP FirstBridge Project)
This online book -- compiled by two professors, a specialist in literature and feminist theory, and an art historian focusing on Renaissance gender issues -- offers student essays on the lives, accomplishments, and philosophical interests of women including Catherine De' Medicis, George Sand, Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, Anais Nin, Josephine Baker, and Janet Flanner.

"Why do Miller and Flanner use the City as a metaphor for feminist agendas? The easy answer is, because Cities themselves represent happenings of social change. Cities are places of concentrated young people, a place would social change would pack the most punch. Change is most apparent in these locations, and so it is appropriate to use the City as a vehicle for advocating feminist messages. The more subtle issues are mixed in there: Miller's feminism encourages us to repudiate preconceived notions of cities as patricarchal gendered places, and promotes a humane and social consciousness. Flanner's failed Delia is the epitome of patriarchal control and urges us not to submit...."
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September 20, 2014
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