TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
John Cheever - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about John Cheever

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of John Cheever, author of The Falconer; twentieth century American Literature
John Cheever   (1912 - 1982)
 
Category:  American Literature
 
Born:  May 27, 1912
Quincy, Massachusetts, United States
 
Died:  June 18, 1982
Ossining, New York, United States
 
Related authors:
Anton Chekhov, Raymond Carver, Shirley Jackson
 
list all writers
 
 
John Cheever - LIFE STORIES
 
 
6/18/1982     John Cheever at Home
On this day in 1982 John Cheever died at the age of seventy, in Ossining, New York. While alive, critics were calling him "the Chekhov of the suburbs"; in their obituary notice, the hometown paper found a comparison to a Russian, but not Chekhov: "Cheever was as closely associated with Ossining as Emerson with Concord, or Tolstoy with Yasnaya Polyana."
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Conversations With John Cheever
by John Cheever, Scott Donaldson (Editor)
interviews
 
Falconer
fiction
 
The Journals of John Cheever
journals
 
The Letters of John Cheever
letters
 
The Stories of John Cheever
fiction
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY JOHN CHEEVER AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Home Before Dark
by Susan Cheever
memoirs
 
FIND BOOKS BY JOHN CHEEVER AT Powell's Books
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John Cheever: Parody and The Suburban Aesthetic
Offers literary criticism and analysis of the short stories "The Housebreaker of Shady Hill," "The Sorrows of Gin," and "Just Tell Me Who It Was," which originally appeared in The New Yorker during the 1950s.

"Cheever satirizes the false hopes and bizarre, but understandable, rationalizations of his characters--their fears and desires are outrageous and overblown, but their craziness is kept within its proper domain, in the family and community, and within the confines of the commute and the cocktail party, to the point that their common daily experiences become so manneristic they are elevated to the status of archetypes, rather than that of stereotypes. The moments when Hake burglarizes; when Amy pours the gin down the sink; and when Pym strikes the man whom he believes to be his wife's lover are consequences of so many prototypical forces, they become expressions of more than just petty fear or frustration."
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September 3, 2014
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