TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Marquis de Sade - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Marquis de Sade

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of the Marquis de Sade
Marquis de Sade   (1740 - 1814)
 
Category:  French Literature
 
Born:  May 29, 1740
Paris, France
 
Died:  December 2, 1814
Charenton, France
 
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Marquis de Sade - LIFE STORIES
 
 
12/2/1814     Same Sade Story
On this day in 1814 the Marquis de Sade died, at the age of seventy-four. Being in an insane asylum for his last fourteen years did not have much impact on de Sade's behavior or style. Until a week before his death he continued to educate his teenaged laundress in the habits which secured his place in prison, and to write up his journal in the manner which has secured his place in literary history.
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Juliette
by Marquis De Sade
fiction
 
Justine, Philosophy in the Bedroom and Other Writings
by Marquis De Sade, Austryn Wainhouse (Translator), Richard Seaver (Translator)
anthology
 
Letters from Prison
by Marquis De Sade, Richard Seaver (Translator)
letters
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY MARQUIS DE SADE AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
An Erotic Beyond: Sade
by Octavio Paz, Eliot Weinberger (Translator)
criticism
 
At Home with the Marquis de Sade
by Francine du Plessix Gray
biography
 
FIND BOOKS BY MARQUIS DE SADE AT Powell's Books
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La Coste: The Castle of Marquis de Sade
Features a virtual tour of Sade's residence. Also available in French and Japanese.
The Marquis de Sade at La Coste
A biography by Francine du Plessix Gray at Salon.com which explores Sade's life and legacy, and the central role of his beloved village, La Coste:

"But above all other material things, above all his many whimsies and caprices, the Marquis de Sade cherished a certain place in his native Provence, a little chateau in a small village called La Coste, which he had inherited from his father's family and on which he looked as his only home. La Coste was to Sade what Walden was to Henry David Thoreau, what Combray was to Marcel Proust, what Amherst was to Emily Dickinson -- the matrix of all inspiration and perhaps also of all delusions, the quintessential Site-as-Muse."
The Marquis de Sade: A Life
This website is operated by Sade biographer Neil Schaeffer, and features a chronological timeline of events in Sade's life, including his youth, marriage, improsonment and asylum, and works. Selected letters from prison are also provided, with more available via weekly e-mail subscription. From a letter to his wife dated August 1779:

"If they who read my letter are angered by it, so much the worse for them . . . They are amusing themselves today after their fashion, they are having fun by preventing me from amusing myself; it is only fair that I should have my turn, and my pen will be my weapon /as long as fate does not furnish me with others."
The Marquis de Sade: Sex, Sacrilege and Sublimity (Crime Library, Court TV)
Features a lengthy biography which sheds light on Sade's family and childhood, his marriage of convenience, and of course, the scandals.

"... as it had been throughout his life, Sade's own arrogance and boundless self-confidence were his own downfall. In late 1776, Sade had returned to La Coste, accompanied by a number of young women procured for him by none other than a local member of the clergy, a Father Durand. However, events quickly degenerated: when word of his deeds reached his abbey, Father Durand was immediately dismissed from the premises. The father of the young women, meanwhile, stormed La Coste in order to extract vengeance from the Marquis. A skirmish ensued, during which the man's pistol fired. While the cartridge was blank, the possibility of being murdered within his own home caused Sade to finally give serious thought to his perilous legal standing within French society."
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October 22, 2017
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