TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Marianne Moore - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Marianne Moore

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of Marianne Moore, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet; twentieth century American Literature and poetry
Marianne Moore   (1887 - 1972)
 
Category:  American Literature
 
Born:  November 15, 1887
St. Louis, Missouri, United States
 
Died:  February 5, 1972
New York City, New York, United States
 
Related authors:
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Marianne Moore - LIFE STORIES
 
 
12/9/1955     Poetry, Ford in Head-On Crash
On this day in 1955 Marianne Moore submitted the last of the names she had contracted to provide to the Ford Motor Company for their new car. According to the sociology Ph.D. that had been hired to conduct their search, Ford wanted a name that "flashes a dramatically desirable picture in people's minds," from "one who knows more about this sort of magic than we." What they got was "Pastelogram," "Intelligent Whale," and Moore....
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Becoming Marianne Moore: Early Poems, 1907-1924
by Marianne Moore, Robin G. Schulze (Editor)
poetry
 
Complete Poems
poetry
 
Selected Letters
by Marianne Moore, Bonnie Costello (Editor)
letters
 
FIND BOOKS BY MARIANNE MOORE AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Elizabeth Bishop and Marianne Moore
by Joanne Feit Diehl
biography
 
FIND BOOKS BY MARIANNE MOORE AT Powell's Books
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Academy of American Poets
Offers a biography, poetry, bibliography, and links. Selected poems include "Baseball and Writing," "A Grave," "The Paper Nautilus," and "Spenser's Ireland."

"She wrote with the freedom characteristic of the other modernist poets, often incorporating quotes from other sources into the text, yet her use of language was always extraordinarily condensed and precise, capable of suggesting a variety of ideas and associations within a single, compact image."
Heath Online Instructor's Guide
A useful site for teachers offers classroom strategies and discussion questions on theme and technique in Moore's poetry. A brief mention of connections with William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens is also provided.

"She does not fit the stereotype of woman as emotional (in contrast to supposedly rational man). Moore, indeed, once remarked that only two or three American women have 'even tried' to write poetry--meaning, one may be sure, Emily Dickinson and herself. (In her last years, she might have added Bishop to her list.)"
Marianne Moore
Read a brief biography about the poet and her love of baseball, a chronology of life events, bibliography, and texts and critical analysis of poems including "The Steeple-Jack," "No Swan So Fine," "The Fish," "An Octopus," "The Pangolin," and "His Shield." Also offers excerpts from essays about Moore by T.S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Randall Jarrell, Elizabeth Bishop, and Hilda Doolittle. Eliot, on Moore:

"My conviction, for what it is worth, has remained unchanged for the last fourteen years: that Miss Moore's poems form part of the small body of durable poetry written in our time; of that small body of writings, among what passes for poetry, in which an original sensibility and alert intelligence and deep feeling have been engaged in maintaining the life of the English language..."
Modern American Poetry
Find a biography, photographs, and critical analysis of "Poetry," "The Fish," "Sojourn in the Whale," "A Grave," "Silence," "Marriage," "Peter," "Bird-Witted," and other poems.

"She was superb at her chosen craft. Her expression is notable for deftness and sharpness of detail, linguistic experimentation, and integration of fresh observation and obscure reading. She teases the reader into looking at reality with keener vision, as though, like her, seemingly for the very first time; challenges the reader to accept the relationship of big and little, animate and inanimate, ideal and object; and invites the reader to note, and practice, the power of words. To those who complained that her poetry often seemed obscure, she once replied that something that was work to write ought to be work to read. Her life displayed and her writings expressed the virtues of courage, loyalty, patience, modesty, spontaneity, and steadfastness."
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December 16, 2017
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